From the Pastor's Desk
 
!!   Alleluia  !! 
What, really, do we celebrate today? Surely, we know the answer: The Resurrection of the Lord! However, most of us assume that the liturgy of this day is a dramatic “reenactment” of Christ’s victory over death, His emergence from the tomb. As we gather on this day, the liturgical assembly is often thought to be engaged in an act of historical “reconstruction”emerging from the tomb. They celebrate not what once happened to Jesus but what is now happening among us as a people called to conversion, gathered in faith, and gifted with the Spirit of holiness. They celebrate God’s own taking possession of our hearts at their deepest core, recreating us as a new human community, gathered with Christ, broken like bread for the life of the world — a community rich in compassion, steadfast in hope, faithful in proclaiming the Gospel, and fearless in the search for justice and peace, with sincere love for one another and for all. The above is inspired/adapted from “The that recreates the scene at the empty tomb. People are encouraged to imagine that they are “actually present,” witnessing Christ’s miraculous “return to life” on Easter morning. I This view is frequently reinforced by popular hymns that focus on the “historical facts” of the celebration.
 
But is history the central focus of our celebration today? Certainly, the early Christian creeds anchored belief in the historical, this-world circumstances that accompanied Jesus’ suffering, crucifixion, death and resurrection. In other words, the saving events of Jesus’ life I were attached to a specific time, in a specific place. His proclamation of the arrival of the Kingdom of God, his challenge to understand that God is love, full of mercy and compassion, his rejection of “religion” as a means of social or political control, all took place not in some heavenly cloud of unknowing, but in a remote I province of the later Roman Empire at a time of sociopolitical transition. 
 
Precisely because these faith-anchoring events are historical, however, they cannot be repeated or “reenacted.” That is why the Church’s long tradition insists that what happened once in history passes over into mystery, into the mystery of the assembly’s liturgical/sacramental celebration. What the Paschal Triduum, and especially Easter, actually celebrates is mystery, not history.
The liturgies of these days do not “take us back” to the Upper Room, the path of Calvary, or the empty tomb. Their ultimate purpose is not to retrace or relive the last hours of Jesus’ life, nor to catch sight of him emerging from the tomb. They celebrate not what once happened to Jesus but what is now happening among us as a people called to conversion, gathered in faith, and gifted with the Spirit of holiness. They celebrate God’s own taking possession of our hearts at their deepest core, recreating us as a new human community, gathered with Christ, broken like bread for the life of the world — a community rich in compassion, steadfast in hope, faithful in proclaiming the Gospel, and fearless in the search for justice and peace, with sincere love for one another and for all.
 
The above is inspired/adapted from
“The Three Days of Pascha” by Nathan Mitchell. T
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Alleluia! The stone rejected by the builders
has become the corner stone (Psalm 8).
 
If we have died with Christ, 
we shall also rise with him (Rom. 8).
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We prepared for this glorious day for forty days. Now we celebrate it for fifty days. “The fifty days from Easter to Pentecost are celebrated in joy and exultation as one feast day, indeed as one great Sunday” (St. Athanasius). The first eight days of the Easter season make up the Octave of Easter and are celebrated as Solemnities of the Lord. The days of the Easter Octave form the“ early hours” of this“ great Sunday” with accounts of the Lord who rose early in the morning, and the early preaching of the disciples who were witnesses to his resurrection.
 
This is the day the Lord has made,
Let us rejoice and be glad in it.
 
I pray that each and every one of you is deeply blessed this holy season. May you be filled with joy and your joy be complete.
 
Christ Is!  Alleluia!!     Fr. Bob